Perspective: I

As Canadians watch events unfold down south regarding the ‘Black Lives Matter’ movement and overall discussions about race, they pay lip service to these topics without looking inward. So here I am to point out the obvious.

Let’s begin with mass murder.

Small pox

We begin with the First Nations people and Jeffrey Amherst. Amherst was a British Army officer who fought to conquer New France and was the first British Governor General of the territories (later Canada).

Smallpox was an infectious disease brought to the New World by European conquerors; since Indigenous people had not previously been exposed they were decimated by the disease when it spread in their communities. This applies from Canada on down to South America and everyone knows this.

Fewer know that Amherst tried to deliberately infect the Indigenous with small pox (clearly showing he knew the disease was deadly among them; no “herd immunity”) as one of many ways in which to “reduce them”.

This has been known for some time by authors and historians (see: Atlas of the North American Indian, 1985 & The Conspiracy of Pontiac and the Indian War after the Conquest of Canada; 1886).

Francis Parkman, the historian who wrote The Conspiracy of Pontiac quotes in his book:

“Could it not be contrived to send the Small Pox among those disaffected tribes of Indians? We must on this occasion use every stratagem in our power to reduce them.”

Vol. II, p.39 (6th edition)

Amherst’s attempts to kill via small pox have been known for quite some time among Indigenous people (and apparently a few others), but was denied at large by “polite white society” as some type of urban myth.

Researchers had to go and and find evidence of the letters and writings in microfilm. (The papers had been microfilmed as part of the British Manuscripts Project in the 1940s.) The research was done on a promise to Floyd Red Crow Westerman of the Dakota Nation who wanted to uncover legitimate evidence of the crime.

The quote from the book has not yet been found in microfilm, but others have:

P.S. You will Do well to try to Innoculate the Indians by means of Blankets, as well as to try Every other method that can serve to Extirpate this Execrable Race. I should be very glad your Scheme for Hunting them Down by Dogs could take Effect, but England is at too great a Distance to think of that at present.

Microfilm reel 34/41, item 114. (Letter image)

This quote was a response from his subordinate lieutenant colonel Henry Bouquet:

P.S. I will try to inocculate [sic] the Indians by means of Blankets that may fall in their hands, taking care however not to get the disease myself. As it is pity to oppose good men against them..”

Microfilm reel 34/40, item 305. (Letter image)

The letters clearly prove a conspiracy among at least some in the British Army to use biological warfare to assist in reducing or exterminating Indigenous nations.

The most basic definition of genocide:

the deliberate killing of a large group of people, especially those of a particular ethnic group or nation.”

Now it could be argued Amherst and his co-conspirators were referring to specific tribes they were in conflict with. However, it shows little concern for Indigenous peoples as a whole, when the disease could easily spread between tribes, killing them off while Europeans remained less exposed.

Murder through biological warfare had been known for some time, yet most liked to insist there was “no proof”, or that intent hadn’t been there – it was an accident later attributed to ill intention.

The fact letters have been found after hundreds of years and describe the will to murder through smallpox is astonishing, when you take into account the time elapsed, the poor system for correspondence, the storage of the letters and so on. If this small trace exists and these men had the hubris to put their designs to paper, one can only guess at the actual attitudes and behavior of the time.

And even if you remain unconvinced about Amherst, we move on to a more recent time with more damning record evidence.

(With thanks for source material from Peter d’Errico.)

Tuberculosis

Most Canadians now know that many children in the residential schools died of tuberculosis. But they wave off the idea these children were intentionally killed, and again describe the incident as accidental or perhaps a bit of ‘well-intentioned’ neglect.

A national journalist attempting to be the “voice of reason” against allegations of murder, wrote this:

“There were front-page stories a century ago, too. In 1897, senior Indian Affairs officials started blowing the whistle on the cavernous, shoddily-built, creaking institutions, pointing out that you couldn’t have built more efficient incubation vectors for contagious disease, and for mass death, if you tried.

Back then, P.H. Bryce, the Indian department’s chief medical officer, conducted a study of 1,500 children interned in 15 different Indian residential schools across Canada. He found that one in four of the children never made it out alive. A separate study of the Kuper Island school found that four of every 10 children sent there over a 25-year period never survived to graduate.

This is sufficiently damning. It is not necessary to assert, as Annett does, that infectious diseases were deliberately employed as part of a plot to “cull” Canada’s aboriginal population. Everybody knows what happened. It is no secret, and is not even a secret that there are mass graves.”

The Tyee: Truth and Native Abuse, 2008

Even while defending the Canadian government on public record, this journalist admits that senior Indian Affairs officials were publicly blowing the whistle: “you couldn’t have built more efficient incubation vectors for contagious disease, and for mass death, if you tried.

He also admits the children were dying en masse; that the issue had been studied and was known in government, nothing was done, and it’s no secret currently there are “mass graves”. (The cognitive dissonance is stunning.)

Conditions were such that officials felt the need to “whistle blow”, which subsequently is damning evidence against the Canadian public – many of whom were aware as well.

Imagine this scenario: the Chinese come and take over Canada; they place all the children in mandatory “re-education” schools and COVID-19 mutates into a deadly strain which children begin to catch. In the schools, the children begin dying at an alarming rate: from a quarter of students to half or more. The Canadian government begs the Chinese to allow the children to stay home since the schools are killing them. Yet the Chinese refuse, claiming ‘education’ precedes the need for safety since the disease is commonplace.

Is this not the willful murder of children? The Canadian government still clings to the narrative it tried to help ‘civilize a savage people’, and in doing so ‘accidentally’ killed off a large amount through incompetence or at worst, neglect.

But if you know you are killing children – is it not murder? If you know half the children will die by attending school and you keep them there, is it not murder? When the chief medical officer for Indian Affairs says the conditions are encouraging disease spread and will kill children – and you sit by indifferently – is it not murder? Of course when you know the outcome there can be no excuses.

They didn’t need to put their deeds onto paper like Jeffrey Amherst, they didn’t need to specify in writing – their deeds speak for themselves when taken into context.

If my coworker wanted to put a hit out on his wife and hired a hit man, and I did nothing, I would still be culpable because I knew the outcome and took no action.

Dr. Bryce, an employee of the Canadian government and Indian Affairs, wrote a book called The Story of A National Crime. It was not called the National Mistake or the National Accident – he called it a CRIME.

Crime: “an action or omission that constitutes an offense that may be prosecuted by the state and is punishable by law.

Duncan Campbell Scott, superintendent of Indian Affairs, brushed off years of Dr. Bryce’s warnings, reports, studies and ultimately his book.

“It is readily acknowledged that Indian children lose their natural resistance to illness by habituating so closely in the residential schools, and that they die at a much higher rate than in their villages. But this alone does not justify a change in the policy of this Department, which is geared towards a final solution of our Indian Problem.”

Department of Indian Affairs Superintendent D.C. Scott to B.C. Indian Agent-General Major D. McKay, DIA Archives, RG 1-Series 12 April 1910

Conclusion

Before I listen to anything the government has to say about the United States and its past, history, or issues, I would like to have the following:

An acknowledgement that Canada’s Governor General Jeffrey Amherst attempted to kill off Indigenous nations with small pox in order to obtain and keep Canadian land.

Acknowledgement of the innocent Indigenous girl slaves “who worked as household help and served as concubines for the French. They were often hardly ten years old. Their average age at death was 17 years.”

An acknowledgement that Canada’s chief medical officer in the 1900s wrote a book claiming the government of Canada was committing a crime.

Acknowledgement that the Canadian government participated in the willful murder of children through both action and omission, ultimately knowing the outcome but pursuing their agenda despite the cost of life.

An acknowledgement by the Canadian government that it continues to protect the abusers of children in residential schools, and puts money before the pursuit of justice.

An acknowledgement by the Canadian government that by protecting the perpetrators of child abuse, and by not admitting to past crimes of murder, it has attempted to protect itself from financial litigation and legal accountability.

Perhaps then I will care about your thoughts on America.


Post Script:

I understand what the journalist is trying to convey: that this was not some diabolical scheme etched in the halls of power on par with the Wannsee conference.

There is no need to assert “that infectious diseases were deliberately employed as part of a plot to “cull” Canada’s aboriginal population.” When you are killing children and know your actions are killing them, but it does not “justify a change in policy” I would argue that is indeed “culling the population”. These children were in the schools and dying because they were not white. One can speak of Canada’s “polite, quiet” way of killing the Indigenous, and levels of intent, but the outcome and facts remain the same: the government chose to kill children to fulfill its agenda.

CULLING according to the Cambridge dictionary:

When people cull animals, they kill them, especially the weaker members of a particular group of them, in order to reduce or limit their number.

Small town Canada, again

As mentioned before in another post: a third of Canadians live in three major cities (Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver) and their metropolitan areas while the remainder live in small towns and cities, including a small percentage in rural areas.

As mentioned in that post (confirmed by Statistics Canada), the most violent and dangerous places in Canada continue to be small towns and cities, betraying the myth of a “safe” benign Canada. Especially when two-thirds of the population live in these communities.

To further illustrate the point I am going to use contemporary headlines from the past 60 days in Nova Scotia (a small province with less than a million people).

A man went on a shooting rampage managing to kill 22 people and wound 3 before being shot by police. He began in Portapique, (a small rural community of about 100 year-round residents), traveling through 16 other locations and was killed in Enfield (less than 5,000 residents).

His killing spree was helped by the fact he was traveling to small, isolated communities and less likely to be discovered during the 13 hours this took place. While it could be fairly argued such an incident is generally unlikely, the fact is that outside Montreal, most spree killings and shootings occur in small places in Canada.

In Truro (population just over 12,000), a guard at the women’s federal prison has been charged with six counts of sexual assault after a year-long investigation. There is also a civil lawsuit pending from inmates claiming sexual assault, who are suing the Correctional Service of Canada.

Also in Truro: a three year old boy has gone missing. The presumption is that he drowned and searches have turned into a ‘recovery effort’. His boots were found at different locations by the river.

While it’s unlikely he was taken by someone, it’s not outside the realm of possibility – especially if no body is recovered. Again, owing to the small community, lack of CCTV, and trusting the “locals”, this could never be confirmed even if it had occurred.

In Hammonds Plains (population approx. 12,000), a 45 year old man killed a woman and has been charged with second-degree murder.

In Preston (population just over 3,000), a man was stabbed during an attempted home invasion but will live.

In Cole Harbour (estimated population just over 12,000), a 48 year old teacher has been charged with sex crimes against a 15 year old girl, with additional victims likely.

In March, in Priestville (population less than 200), 3-4 masked men broke into a home, hit the occupants in the head with a baseball bat and made off with some small items.

The police also put out a call for any information on the disappearance and suspected homicide of Tony Walsh who’d gone missing in Truro.

I could go on, but I’ll end it here. Suffice to say that small cities and communities in Canada have plenty of murders, rapes, home invasions and other petty crime. While it may seem like stating the obvious, you wouldn’t know it judging by the local propaganda.

For some strange reason the media and nation pretend as though violent crime is a rarity in Canada when it exists everywhere and the largest cities are safest for both familial and non-familial violence.

Shootings in Canada

With the lock-down due to Covid-19, you’d think there would be a flurry of postings as we’re stuck at home and barely working, after all. But I’ve gone from disgust and disappointment, to rage, to utter contempt and indifference. Canada is so dull and pathetic even taking 15 minutes to write about it is a chore.

I wrote before about how Canada is a real shithole outside its major cities, where violence is rampant (confirmed by Stats Canada). Now we’ll take a look at shootings in the country to once again make the point.


Brampton Centennial mass shooting, 1975:

A 16 year old kills two students, wounds 13 others and then kills himself in a high school in Brampton, Ontario (population at the time: 98,440).


St. Pius X High School shooting, 1975:

An 18 year old rapes and stabs a teenage girl to death before traveling to school with a shotgun. He kills one teen and wounds five others before committing suicide in Ottawa, Ontario (population at the time: 676,000).


Lennoxville massacre, 1985:

During a Hell’s Angels dispute, five bikers are shot dead in a clubhouse in Lennoxville (Sherbrooke) Quebec (current population: 5,502). Four Hell’s Angels members were later convicted of first-degree murder.


Ecole Polytechnique massacre, 1989:

A misogynist kills fourteen women (wounding another fourteen) at a college in Montreal, before shooting himself.


Concordia University massacre, 1992:

A professor at a university in Montreal shoots and kills four colleagues.


Mark Chahal massacre, 1996:

Mark Vijay Chahal shoots nine people (estranged wife and other family members) at a wedding party in Vernon, British Columbia (current population: 48,073).


Myers High School shooting, 1999:

A 14 year old boy brings a semi-automatic rifle to school and manages to kill one student and wound another before being tackled by a teacher in Taber, Alberta (current population: 8,548). He was sentenced to three years in prison and escaped from a halfway house in 2005.


OC Transpo massacre, 1999:

A former OC Transpo employee pulls into the company’s garage and goes on a shooting spree, he kills four and then himself.


Mayerthorpe shootings, 2005:

A man shoots and kills four RCMP officers executing a search warrant on a farm near Mayerthorpe, Alberta (current population: 1,205).


Shedden / Bandidos massacre, 2006:

Eight members of the Bandidos biker gang are shot to death (in a takeover and attempt to frame the Hell’s Angels) on a farm nearby Shedden, Ontario in Southwold Township (current population: 4,421).


Spiritwood shootings, 2006:

RCMP officers pursue a man fleeing in a truck; shootouts ensue and two officers are shot in the head, in Spiritwood, Saskatchewan (current population: 786).


Dawson College shooting, 2006:

A man goes on a shooting spree at a Montreal college. He ultimately kills one, injures nineteen, and then commits suicide.


Bolsa Shooting, 2009:

Gang members targeting rivals shoot three people at a restaurant in Calgary.


Claresholm Highway massacre, 2011:

A 21 year old man kills his ex girlfriend and two other men before shooting himself, on a highway outside Claresholm, Alberta (current population: 3,424).


University of Alberta shooting, 2012:

A security guard in Edmonton, Alberta, shoots four of his coworkers in a building on the campus of the University of Alberta. He steals money from the armored truck and attempts to flee.


Danzig Street shooting, 2012:

During a block party in a Toronto neighborhood, three gang members open fire on a crowd of two-hundred people; two people are killed and twenty-four injured. (One man used an Uzi submachine gun.)


Edmonton shooting, 2014:

A man goes on a killing spree in Edmonton, Alberta: he killed seven relatives (including two children) before traveling to another house to kill a woman, then committed suicide in a restaurant.


Moncton shootings, 2014:

A 25 year old man shoots five RCMP officers, killing three and wounding two in Moncton, New Brunswick (current population: 108,620).


La Loche shootings, 2016:

A 17 year old kills two cousins and two teachers in La Loche, Saskatchewan (current population: 2,372).


Quebec mosque mass shooting, 2016:

A man goes on a shooting rampage in a mosque, injuring nineteen and killing six people in Quebec City, Quebec (current population: 705,103).


Danforth/Toronto shooting, 2018:

A man goes on a shooting rampage in a Greektown neighborhood in Toronto: killing two and wounding thirteen.


Fredericton shooting, 2018:

A man goes on a shooting spree in Fredericton, New Brunswick, killing four people – including two police officers who were first responders (population at the time: 59,409).


Portapique mass shooting, 2019:

A 51 year old man dresses as an RCMP officer and then goes on a 12 hour shooting spree killing 22 people in Portapique, Nova Scotia (current population: 100 year round, 250 in summer).


This is not an exhaustive list.

Of the twenty-three listed here, ten were in major cities:

Montreal (3), Toronto (2), Ottawa (2), Edmonton (2), Calgary (1)

The rest were in small-time “safe” Canadian communities; 11 under 100k (with one at 108k).

Recommended Reading

Here are some books I recommend reading (if you can be bothered to read about Canada) mentioned in this blog and elsewhere.


(My favorite on this list) Black Ice by Darril & George Fosty.

“In 1895, The Colored Hockey League of the Maritimes was formed in Halifax, Nova Scotia … The Colored League would emerge as a premier force in Canadian hockey and supply the resilience necessary to preserve a unique culture which exists to this day. Unfortunately their contributions were conveniently ignored, or simply stolen, as white teams and hockey officials, influenced by the black league, copied elements of the black style or sought to take self-credit for black hockey innovations. Black Ice is the first written record of the Colored Hockey League in the Maritimes.”

This book is about so much more than hockey: the Maritimes, slavery and Black history in Canada, and interesting, worthwhile people.


Keeping Canada British: The Ku Klux Klan in 1920’s Saskatchewan by James M. Pistula.

“The Ku Klux Klan had its origins in the American South. It was suppressed but rose again in the 1920s, spreading into Canada, especially Saskatchewan. This book offers a new interpretation for the appeal of the Klan in 1920s Saskatchewan. It argues that the Klan should not be portrayed merely as an irrational outburst of intolerance but as a populist aftershock of the Great War – and a slightly more extreme version of mainstream opinion that wanted to keep Canada British. Through its meticulous exploration of a controversial issue central to the history of Saskatchewan and the formation of national identity, this book shines light upon a dark corner of Canada’s past.”

It can be a bit of a dry read at times, and the bumbling characters of Saskatchewan aren’t too exciting, but it’s educational regarding Canadian racism and the Klan.


Canada’s Forgotten Slaves: Two Hundred Years of Bondage by Marcel Trudel and George Tombs.

“… By painstakingly combing through unpublished archival records of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Marcel Trudel gives a human face to the over 4,000 Aboriginal and Black slaves bought, sold and exploited in colonial Canada. He reveals the identities of the slave owners, who ranged from governors, seigneurs, and military officers to bishops, priests, nuns, judges, and merchants. Trudel describes the plight of slaves–the joys and sorrows of their daily existence. Trudel also recounts how some slaves struggled to gain their liberty. He documents Canadian politicians, historians and ecclesiastics who deliberately falsified the record, glorifying their own colonial-era heroes, in order to remove any trace of the thousands of Aboriginal and Black slaves held in bondage for two centuries in Canada.”

An eye-opening history of slavery in Canada and the best place to start on the subject.


Murder City: The Untold Story of Canada’s Serial Killer Capital, 1959-1984 by Michael Arntfield.

” … From the earliest documented case of homicidal copycatting in Canada, to the fact that at any given time up to six serial killers were operating at once in the deceivingly serene “Forest City,” London was once a place that on the surface presented a veneer of normality when beneath that surface dark things would whisper and stir. Through it all, a lone detective would go on to spend the rest of his life fighting against impossible odds to protect the city against a tidal wave of violence that few ever saw coming, and which to this day even fewer choose to remember… Murder City is an explosive book over fifty years in the making, and is the history of London, Ontario as never told before. Stranger than fiction, tragic, ironic, horrifying, yet also inspiring, this is the true story of one city under siege, and a book that marks a game changer for the true crime genre.”

There’s a lot of information here and it does jump around a bit. It’s a horrifying, disturbing look at serial killers and unsolved crime in Canada.


Loss of Faith: How The Air India Bombers Got Away With Murder by Kim Bolan.

“On June 23, 1985, Canada found itself on the international terrorism map when two bombs built in B.C. detonated within an hour of each other on opposite sides of the world, killing 329 men, women, and children… When charges were finally laid against three Sikh separatists, the families believed justice was almost theirs. But their faith was shaken when one suspect pleaded guilty to manslaughter and got a five-year sentence for more than three hundred deaths.”

A disturbing look at terrorism in Canada and the men who got away with mass murder. It’s difficult to read about the incompetence of Canadian law enforcement and its judicial system.


The Hanging of Angelique by Afua Cooper.

“Writer, historian and poet Afua Cooper tells the astonishing story of Marie-Joseph Angélique, a slave woman convicted of starting a fire that destroyed a large part of Montréal in April 1734 and condemned to die a brutal death. In a powerful retelling of Angélique’s story—now supported by archival illustrations—Cooper builds on 15 years of research to shed new light on a rebellious Portuguese-born black woman who refused to accept her indentured servitude. At the same time, Cooper completely demolishes the myth of a benign, slave-free Canada, revealing a damning 200- year-old record of legally and culturally endorsed slavery.”

This book is not just the story of one condemned slave, but a sweeping history of slavery and early Canada.


This list will be updated periodically.

Remember When? … #airindiabombing

Remember When is a new series of posts where we take a look back at some of the funny, bizarre and downright disturbing incidents in Canada’s past.

Since cakers like to judge everyone else (particularly Americans) and point out their historic wrong-doings, it’s time to take a mirror to these incompetent hypocrites. Enjoy!


Loss of Faith: How The Air India Bombers Got Away With Murder

From Amazon:

“On June 23, 1985, Canada found itself on the international terrorism map when two bombs built in B.C. detonated within an hour of each other on opposite sides of the world, killing 329 men, women, and children.

Canadian Sikh separatists, upset at the Indian government for attacking their religion’s holiest shrine, the Golden Temple, were immediately suspected by the RCMP of perpetrating the worst act of aviation terrorism before Sept. 11, 2001. But while police agencies scrambled to infiltrate a close-knit immigrant community and collect evidence against the suspects, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service was destroying taped telephone calls between the same people the RCMP was investigating.

For years those at the centre of the terrorist plot tried to protect their dark secret. Two Sikh newspaper publishers who overheard an alleged confession by one of the bombers were assassinated. Other potential witnesses were threatened and intimidated. Journalists who wrote about the suspects were targeted by death threats and harassment. The suspects founded charities and participated in political parties, attending fundraising dinners for premiers and prime ministers. And the families of the victims fought to be recognized for their unimaginable loss as the result of an act of terrorism plotted in Canada. When charges were finally laid against three Sikh separatists, the families believed justice was almost theirs. But their faith was shaken when one suspect pleaded guilty to manslaughter and got a five-year sentence for more than three hundred deaths.

The Air-India trial judge spoke in his ruling of the “the senseless horror” of the bombings. He called the plot “a diabolical act of terrorism” with “roots in fanaticism at its basest and most inhumane level.” He then acquitted Sikh leaders Ripudaman Singh Malik and Ajaib Singh Bagri on all charges, leaving the victims’ families reeling and the biggest case in Canadian history officially unsolved.

Kim Bolan is an award-winning investigative reporter who has covered the Air-India bombing case since the day Flight 182 went down off the coast of Ireland. Her work on the Air-India story has taken her to Punjab five times over the last twenty years where she met with militant Sikh separatist leaders and victims of the violence. She also followed Air-India mastermind Talwinder Singh Parmar to Pakistan before his 1992 slaying and chased down other suspects in England and across Canada. But she faced the most danger at home in Vancouver where the stories she uncovered about the Air-India case led to a series of death threats against her.”


Terrorists? Bombings? Destroying evidence and tapes? Assassinations? Murderers rubbing shoulders with politicians? A five year sentence for killing hundreds of people? Wow, this is India – right? Nope this is good ol’ British Columbia, Canada!

(Welcome to B.C. … also known as Bring Cash or Be Corrupt.)


So why don’t Canadians ever discuss the Air India Bombing? Why do they know so little about it? Why doesn’t anyone care? Questions asked by a piece in The Tyee:

“All 329 people on board Air India Flight 182 on June 23, 1985, 33 years ago today, were killed, including 280 citizens or permanent residents of Canada.

They were lost to a bomb that exploded while their plane was in Irish airspace, en route from Canada to India. The bomb had been planted in Canada in an act of terror planned by extremists allegedly advocating for a separate Sikh state in the Punjab.

It was Canada’s worst mass murder, yet it is barely remembered in this country.

Today, Canadians commonly regard the bombing as an Indian tragedy, or at most an Indo-Canadian tragedy. They typically dwell on the terrorism, but rarely on the grief and hardship of fathers, mothers, wives, husbands, children, friends and neighbours left behind.

Why hasn’t this tragedy claimed a prominent place in Canadian history and public memory? Some now call it Canada’s 9/11, but until the attack in New York City some 16 years later, they didn’t call it much at all.

The Canadian families of the dead wonder year after year why no one but them seems to care, or why their grief is seen as less worthy than that of others who are more openly taken into the nation’s heart.

The answer is simple: Canada hides from the truth. No doubt racism is involved (they’re less “Canadian” being brown or immigrants) but much more than that – Canada never acknowledges its corruption, rot, or hypocrisy. To do so would involve honesty and then efforts to change … Canadians prefer to ignore, whitewash or deny. Ignoring facts is easy, action is difficult.


The controversy would rear its ugly head again with the election of Jagmeet Singh as NDP leader. He was asked questions about one of the suspects (considered a leader in the conspiracy but never found guilty due to insufficient evidence) and in typical Canadian style there were no straight answers, whining about “racism” and absolutely nothing constructive accomplished or discovered.

From The Georgia Straight:

“Not long after Jagmeet Singh was elected NDP leader, he sat down for an interview with the CBC’s Terry Milewski in early October….

Given Milewski’s history covering this story, it shouldn’t come as a huge surprise that he asked the new NDP leader if he would denounce Parmar—who’s been glorified as a Sikh martyr at the Dasmesh Darbar gurdwara in Surrey.

Singh, a baptized Sikh who wears a turban, replied that “we need to make sure that the investigation results in a conviction of someone who is actually responsible”.

And for a few days, there was a media and social-media firestorm over Milewski’s question, Singh’s answer, and the CBC journalist’s subsequent tweet…

Critics of Milewski said he would never ask this question of a white political leader. Singh himself called the question “offensive”, saying any Canadian would denounce anyone held responsible for terrorism.

Milewski’s defenders, on the other hand, said it was a legitimate question to ask of a man who wanted to become prime minister…


… Then there’s Jagmeet Singh, a trained criminal defence lawyer who says he would like to see convictions before commenting on who’s responsible. And as long as Singh maintains this position, he can expect to be roasted periodically by those who utterly reject that proposition and insist that it’s been proven that Parmar was the mastermind.

The Air India bombing occurred more than 30 years ago and at this stage, it appears unlikely that anyone else will be charged.

But it still has the potential to play a role in the 2019 federal election. This is particularly true if Singh’s point of view comes under criticism from his Liberal and Conservative opponents, senior Canadian journalists, former B.C. premier Dosanjh, and relatives of deceased passengers.

The Air India bombing still matters for a multitude of reasons, especially for the painful losses endured by so many Canadian families. Many of them were appalled by Josephson’s court ruling in the case involving Malik and Bagri and these relatives likely won’t stay silent about a potential prime minister who refuses to condemn Parmar.”


Singh changed his tune after the backlash, from the CBC:

After having expressed some doubts, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said today he accepts the Air India inquiry’s conclusion that Talwinder Singh Parmar was the mastermind behind the deadly mid-air bombing that killed hundreds of Canadians — and he thinks it’s inappropriate for some Sikhs to glorify Parmar by displaying his photo.

Despite his more recent statement, there will now always be some who wonder if he harbors terrorist sympathies since he couldn’t simply spit this out at the beginning. Telling sign or rookie mistake?


Post Script:

It’s got everything one would expect: a belief that terrorism couldn’t happen in ‘magical Canada’, and incompetence by CSIS and the RCMP. (In fairness to CSIS it was a new organization, nonetheless it’s doubtful results would have been different otherwise.)

As you reach the middle of the book it gets to be a slog reading about these odious thugs terrorizing the community, murdering people, and scamming the government out of millions of dollars. Towards the end it’s also difficult to read about them getting away with mass murder.

This has all the hallmarks of a classic Canadian story: racism, incompetence, corruption, and of course no change or improvement after thirty years. Did anyone expect anything less?

Canada is a Shit Hole

I would love to live in Europe but unfortunately I don’t qualify for long-term residence, maybe in the future. So for now I content myself with going to the USA – a place I can appreciate despite its many issues. The United States is large and diverse enough that life is what you make it. Unfortunately (as I know well from personal experience) the same cannot be said for Canada.

I am constantly bombarded with fear mongering about the USA. It’s as though Canadians can’t fathom that there are more living options than the rough neighborhoods in Chicago, Baltimore or south-central Los Angeles. The absurdity of the anti-American propaganda is indescribable. Yes there are some bad people down there, and terrible things do happen, but they also happen here. So let’s take a look at some “Canadian” living
:

Canada’s three major cities (Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver) house more than a third of the population. Outside these locations the majority of Canadians live in small cities and towns; less than 1 in 5 live in rural areas. 


For 2018 the most dangerous places are listed by MacLean’s magazine, rated according to the Crime Severity Index:


1) North Battleford, Saskatchewan (pop: 13,567)


2) Thompson, Manitoba (pop: 12,878)


3) Wetaskiwin, Alberta (pop: 12,486)


4) Prince Albert & area, Saskatchewan (pop: 35,102)


5) Portage la Prairie, Manitoba (pop: 12,949)


6) Red Deer, Alberta (pop: 99,718)


7) Williams Lake, British Columbia (pop: 10,508)


8) Quesnel, British Columbia (pop: 12,064)


9) Langley, British Columbia (pop: 117,285)


10) Prince George, British Columbia (pop: 65,510)


[Note: population data taken from latest government census reports available (2016). Current stats should be roughly equivalent.]



In 2017, the five worst cities by crime rate were:


5) Edmonton: “The city has had a persistent problem with violent crime, especially sex-based crimes such as sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, and sexual violations against children.”


4) Regina: “Regina, ranks rather highly (or lowly, depending on how you look at it) when it comes to overall violent crime in Canada.  It’s been trading places with Saskatoon the past few years …”


3) Saskatoon: “The city has flipped back and forth with Regina (see above) in the overall rankings, and has sometimes even found itself at the ignominious “top” of the standings.”


2) Thunder Bay: “While it ranks eighth in overall crime, the CBC reported that it’s the second-most violent city in Canada.  Sadly, that rating isn’t a one-off incident, either.  In 2012, the homicide rate was higher in Thunder Bay than in any other major metropolitan area in Canada.”


1) Winnipeg: “… but for all of that, the notorious neighbourhoods which make up the North-Central portion of Winnipeg, from South Point Douglas to West Broadway, reported double the crime rate of Compton, California in 2012.”



In 2016, the most dangerous cities according to MacLean’s: (Crime Severity Index)


1. Grande Prairie, Alta. (pop: 63,166)

2. Victoria, B.C. (pop: 84,289)
3. Red Deer, Alta. (pop: 100,418)
4. Prince George, B.C. (pop: 65,510)
5. Winnipeg, Man. (pop: 709,253)
6. Saskatoon, Sask. (pop: 254,569)
7. Fort McMurray, Alta. (pop: 61,374)
8. Thunder Bay, Ont. (pop: 110,984)
9. Surrey, BC (pop: 498,720)
10. Edmonton, Alta. (pop: 928,182)

Over half are at about 100k people or less! “Safe Canada?” Not so much.


There was only one article on the subject in the Canadian Encyclopedia. Aside from Detroit’s significantly higher homicide rate, it had this to say:

“We fare no better than the U.S. in other areas. The break and enter rates in Chilliwack, B.C., Victoria and Regina, for instance, rank within the top 10 per cent of all American cities.

The per capita robbery rates in Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Regina would put them among the top 10 robbery-plagued metropolitan areas of the U.S. And you are far more likely to have your automobile stolen in Winnipeg or Joliette, Que., than anywhere in the U.S., including metropolitan Detroit and Las Vegas, the auto theft capitals of America.

Even at that, a crime analysis this January by the Vancouver Board of Trade concludes official rates are misleadingly low: “only about one-third of actual crimes in Canada are reported to police.”

At the time the article was written the most dangerous cities in the country were listed as: Regina, Saskatoon and Winnipeg, followed by Prince George, Edmonton, New Westminster (pop: 70,996), Chilliwack (pop: 83,788), Victoria (pop: 84,289), Vancouver and Halifax (pop: 414,129). And I’m quoting fairly recent population statistics, these locations would’ve been even less populated at the time.

When we skip back to 2010, Maclean’s said the most dangerous were:

1 Prince George, B.C.
2 Victoria, B.C. 
3 Regina, Sask. 
4 Saskatoon, Sask. 
5 Fort McMurray, Alta. 
6 Kelowna, B.C. (pop: 179,839)
7 Grande Prairie, Alta.
8 Surrey, B.C. 
9 Chilliwack, B.C. 
10 Winnipeg, Man. 
11 Red Deer, Alta. 
12 Nanaimo, B.C. (pop: 83,810) 
13 Edmonton, Alta. 
14 New Westminster, B.C.(pop: 65,976)
15 Belleville, Ont. (pop: 92,540)

Again, most of these places barely scraping the 100k mark


You can view a documentary on missing women from the
‘Highway of Tears’ regions.

The film includes Vanderhoof, a small northern community of less than 5,000 people. Vanderhoof is a great example of the real Canada:


In 2012, two men murdered a woman there. In 2013, at least two people were murdered there. In 2014, a serial killer born and raised there was sentenced for the murders of four women in the region. In 2015, three Vanderhoof locals were charged with that year’s first murder in nearby Prince George. In 2016, two people were sentenced for the murder and beheading of a local man. In 2018 a local man was murdered in a hotel. 


And as a report from Statistics Canada makes clear: children and youth are in more danger in small towns, rural areas and minor cities than in Canada’s most populated centers (family and non-familial violence).



So the only halfway decent places (by Canadian standards) worth living in are Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal and Calgary. But trust me, I’ll be getting around to a post on these last three
.

I walked around inebriated in numerous Los Angeles neighborhoods, alone, and felt far safer than I have in many places in shit hole Canada. (The people were far nicer too, even the ‘undesirables’.)


My point? CANADA IS A SHIT HOLE.


It’s a cold, boring, violent, stagnant place with all of America’s problems, racism, violence and crime – yet none of the benefits of living in such a diverse, interesting place filled with passionate people. Canadians are smug about “safe” Canada … delusional as usual.


2020 update

Most dangerous (and population):

  1. Thompson, Manitoba (13,678)
  2. North Battleford, Saskatchewan (14,315)
  3. Portage la Prairie, Manitoba (13,000)
  4. Prince Albert & area, Saskatchewan (43,000)
  5. Quesnel, British Columbia (23,000)
  6. Wetaskiwin, Alberta (12,655)
  7. Selkirk, Manitoba (10,278)
  8. Terrace, British Columbia (11,643)
  9. Williams Lake, British Columbia (10,753)
  10. Timmins, Ontario (41,788)

None of the top 10 have made the 100k pop mark – way to go Canada! Let’s take a look at the next 10:

Prince Rupert, B.C. (11,733) / Kenora & Area, ON (15,096) / Winnipeg, MB (749,534) / Thunder Bay & area, ON (121, 621) / Yorkton, SK (19,643) / New Glasgow, NS (9,075) / Port Alberni, B.C. (18,000) / Fort St. John, B.C. (21,000) / Prince George, B.C. (81,345) / Greater Napanee, ON (15,892).

And two places made it over the 100k mark! Check back in 5 years for more of the same.

Canada’s sex offender registry

According to the RCMP:

“The National Sex Offender Registry is a national registration system for sex offenders who have been convicted of designated sex offences and ordered by the courts to report annually to police… 

It is a database maintained by the RCMP that provides Canadian police services with important information that will improve their ability to investigate and prevent crimes of a sexual nature.  

The public does not have access to the National Sex Offender Registry.”

Canada has a long tradition of child abuse: from the residential schools to Catholic churches, and twisted abuse in small towns and the north.

It figures cakers would make a national registry that nobody could actually see, that way parents can’t look up nearby predators to protect their children like they can in the USA.

Who is on the list? According to Maclean’s:

“At last count, the national sex offender registry contained 43,217 names—or about one entry for every 813 people in Canada.” 

“Unlike in the United States, where sex offender registries are publicly searchable, Canada’s version was never designed for citizen consumption. Its founding purpose is to help police locate potential suspects who live near a crime scene, not provide parents with a printout of every convicted molester residing in the neighbourhood.”

It’s okay for law enforcement to have the information to investigate a crime after the fact, but not acceptable for diligent parents to have the information for crime prevention and neighborhood safety. Makes sense … if you’re Canadian.

It gets better, as in backwards Canada sex offenders are winning court rights:

“If a national sex offender database doesn’t contain the name of every known sex offender, after all, is it even worth having?  

In a legal first, Ndhlovu convinced a judge last October that the NSOR is unconstitutional because all convicted sex offenders automatically make the list, regardless of how relatively minor their crimes might be, or minimal the threat they may pose. Simply put, the judge found that denying an offender the opportunity to seek an exemption from the database—especially someone like Ndhlovu, who displayed “great remorse” for his actions and is considered a “very low risk to re-offend”—violates his Charter right to life, liberty and security of the person. 

“Subjecting all offenders, regardless of their future risk, to onerous reporting requirements, random compliance checks by police, and internal stigma, goes further than what is necessary to accomplish the goal of protecting the public,” wrote Madam Justice Andrea Moen, of Alberta’s Court of Queen’s Bench. “The law as it stands will now place Mr. Ndhlovu on police radar for the rest of his life anytime a sexual offence is committed by a black man of average height in his neighbourhood. I find that requiring him to register bears no connection to the object of assisting police officers in the investigation or prevention of future sex crimes.”

 ” … At the heart of the legal arguments is a question that has divided policymakers since before the registry even launched in 2004: Should every convicted sex offender be automatically added to the system? Or should judges have the leeway to decide who makes the cut, taking into account the circumstances of the crime and the specific danger posed by the perpetrator?”

Welcome to Canada folks: protecting women and children is a minor detail next to protecting the rights of sex offenders. If you don’t want to be placed on the list it’s quite simple: don’t commit sexual assault. Plenty have gone through life without committing the “mistake” of sexually assaulting others.

When the data base began it was “discretionary” which allowed for a judge to decide on a ‘registration order’. Predictably: “The result? Hundreds of convicted rapists, pedophiles and child pornographers were left off, either because a Crown did not apply or a judge did not approve.”

After a 2008 Maclean’s investigation into the matter which put it in the spotlight, changes were promised. Starting in 2011, changes were made to include automatic inclusion.

( 2011 !!! WHAT THE HELL CANADA?!)


Not only that:

“Offenders can also apply for removal after a certain period of time (someone with a lifetime order must wait 20 years, for example).”

So initial registration (a simple process), checking in once a year, and being eligible to apply for removal is “too much” for the poor burdened sex offenders of Canada.

Whenever it faces criticism, Canada falls back on the following argument against a public registry: by allowing sex offenders to remain anonymous in the community they are being “protected”. Being protected they are more likely to integrate into society, and if living a “safe, normal” life they are less likely to reoffend – or so is the perverse logic about the matter.

A Canadian study on recidivism rates of sexual offenders (2004) shows:

“Table 2 summarises the recidivism estimates for three distinct time periods, five years, ten years, and fifteen years, for each of the subgroups examined.

The overall recidivism rates (14% after 5 years, 20% after 10 years and 24% after 15 years) were similar for rapists (14%, 21% and 24%) and the combined group of child molesters (13%, 18%, and 23%).

There were, however, significant differences between the child molesters, with the highest rates observed among the extrafamilial boy-victim child molesters (35% after 15 years) and the lowest observed rates for the incest offenders (13% after 15 years).

… Offenders with a prior sexual offence conviction had recidivism rates about double the rate observed for first-time sexual offenders (19% versus 37% after 15 years).”

Recidivism rates tend to change depending on the study. What’s interesting is that this study included Americans (Washington, California) and Brits (England, Wales) – a significant portion I’ll add. The SOR is public in the United States, but only accessible in the UK by law enforcement, teachers, youth leaders, sports club managers, landlords and some others. There is a disclosure scheme whereby parents can request the record of a person with unsupervised access to the child.

I wonder how much the recidivism rates were affected by the public SOR in the USA, and a somewhat open registry in the UK? How does that factor in, versus Canada? It doesn’t say.

They try to put a positive spin on it with this:

“Most sexual offenders do not re-offend sexually over time. This may be the most important finding of this study as this finding is contrary to some strongly held beliefs.”

Interesting conclusion to come to based on a little over 4,000 people studied, considering the global amount of sexual predators. Do these predators reoffend more in developing nations without registries and with poorer law enforcement agencies?

Also pointed out earlier in the article: each study on this subject compromises different definition and criteria, making it difficult to pin down matching conclusions.

But even just going by this study, we can conclude that very serious sex offenders overall reoffend at a rate of about 24%. That’s roughly 1 in 4 offenders. While it may not be “most”, it is a frighteningly significant amount.

If I threw one of the authors into an abandoned building with four rapists and told her “only one” was likely to reoffend, I wonder how comforted she’d be?

If a neighbor three doors down is protected and goes on to rape an eight year old, I’m sure her father will be comforted by the fact the RCMP have access to the SOR to “investigate” the crime afterwards. Caker logic!

Until sussing out which offenders will reoffend becomes an exact science or has enough accuracy to merit discussion, we best make do with what we have and protect people, especially children!

Canada: haven for serial killers and sex offenders.

Canada: shit hole with no regards for the victims.

Canada = dump.

Post Script:

It should be noted that this study does not even begin to touch on the subject of psychopathy, which is intertwined with serious crimes.

A large percentage of violent crimes are committed by persons with psychopathy or other Cluster-B disorders. These people are notoriously difficult to treat and can’t be cured; they’re often able to fool even hardened detectives and world class researchers.

If the statistics in this study are reflective of recidivism by ASPD offenders, then keeping the list private in hopes of rehabilitation is in effect aiding the criminals and makes no difference whatsoever to future outcomes.

Article: The Criminal Psychopath (see section III).

“The picture is almost as bad for violent sexual recidivism. Psychopathy is a significant predictor of sexual violence. Rice and Harris found that 75% of all individuals with both a high Hare score and a positive sexual deviance response—defined as a positive penile pleithismograph response to depictions of children, rape cues, or nonsexual violence—committed a new sexually violent crime within 10 years (as shown in Figure 5).”

Remember When? … #serialkillercapital

Remember When is a new series of posts where we take a look back at some of the funny, bizarre and downright disturbing incidents in Canada’s past.

Since cakers like to judge everyone else (particularly Americans) and point out their historic wrong-doings, it’s time to take a mirror to these incompetent hypocrites. Enjoy!


London, Ontario: Serial Killer Capital of the World

From the CBC:

“At first glance, London, Ont., doesn’t seem like the type of place that would harbour a serial killer, but a new book has revealed it may have been a more dangerous place than meets the eye.   

Only 192 kilometres southwest of Toronto, the city became the “serial killer capital of the world” from 1959 to 1984, according to Michael Arntfield, a criminology professor at the University of Western Ontario. With only a population of roughly 200,000 people at the time, the city may have had as many as six serial killers, more per capita than everywhere else on the planet.”

Yeah, that sounds about right for Ontario!

 “Arntfield, who also served as a London police officer for 15 years, analyzed 32 homicides, all the victims being women and children, over a 15-year period…   

Monsters such as the Mad Slasher, Chambermaid Slayer and Balcony Killer are suspected of having roamed the city’s streets. Some of the murderers were never captured, Arntfield says, but he suspects they escaped to Toronto, where they continued to harm the innocent.”

More incompetence:

“While these lives are being taken in Toronto, Alsop is trying to sound the alarm to his superiors that this is the work of a serial killer and it started in London and has moved to Toronto.  

In the book, there is a very chilling document that was found in his codex … and it is the first of several teletype transmissions he sent, like an early version of a fax, and it is sent to the higher ups in Toronto saying, listen, London is under siege by [what he refers to as] sexual psychopaths, which is not a common term certainly for a police officer to be using at the time. He is saying there are at least two or more sexual psychopaths preying on this city. We need reinforcements. He was effectively alone in the hinterland. And there is no evidence there was any response. It fell on deaf ears and really the city was left to its own devices with him as the sole person chasing these killers.”


From the Guardian:

In regards to the book Murder City:

“Dennis Alsop, a detective sergeant with the Ontario provincial police, was based in the London area between 1950 and 1979. He kept all of his notes and research on the murders hidden until he died in 2012.  

“Through [Alsop’s] diary entries, he knew who did it and he was basically stonewalled from making arrests, because they felt he didn’t have enough, they wanted a slam dunk,” said Arntfield. “So he kept tabs on these people on his own time until they moved from London, and it seems that at least in one case there are other victims in Toronto connected to the same killer.”  

But even if all of the remaining cases were found to be the work of a single killer, London would retain the record for having the largest verified concentration of serial killers operating in one place at one time.  

“New York and Los Angeles at any given time have had four or five, but London at the time had a mean population of 170,000,” said Arntfield, adding that in megacities like New York and Los Angeles the per-capita equivalent would be about 80 or 90 per city.”


What’s amazing to me (but also unsurprising) is the fact not only did London have more serial killers per capita at the time, but it had roughly the equivalent of a major American city, which you’d expect to still have attracted more (per capita) on the basis of anonymity and choice of victims.

Of course back then Canada was even more of a hillbilly backwater than it is today.

What’s also sad to me is the fact this dedicated officer Dennis Alsop tried to solve these crimes, received no support and was left struggling on his own. In fact, he was so dedicated: “He kept all of his notes and research on the murders hidden until he died in 2012.” He didn’t even get to see a final resolution.

His work became the basis for the book: “Murder City: The Untold Story of Canada’s Serial Killer Capital, 1954-1984″. I’ll add it to my reading list, because I’m actually quite touched by Alsop’s efforts.


From Amazon:

“Like the mythic cities of Gotham or Gomorrah, London, Ontario was for many years an unrivalled breeding ground of depravity and villainy, the difference being that its monsters were all too real. In its coming to inherit the unwanted distinction of being the serial killer capital of not just Canada-but apparently also the world during this dark age in the city’s sordid history- the crimes seen in London over this quarter-century period remain unparalleled and for the most part unsolved. From the earliest documented case of homicidal copycatting in Canada, to the fact that at any given time up to six serial killers were operating at once in the deceivingly serene “Forest City,” London was once a place that on the surface presented a veneer of normality when beneath that surface dark things would whisper and stir.


Through it all, a lone detective would go on to spend the rest of his life fighting against impossible odds to protect the city against a tidal wave of violence that few ever saw coming, and which to this day even fewer choose to remember. With his death in 2011, he took these demons to his grave with him but with a twist-a time capsule hidden in his basement, and which he intended to one day be opened. Contained inside: a secret cache of his diaries, reports, photographs, and hunches that might allow a new generation of sleuths to pick up where he left off, carry on his fight, and ultimately bring the killers to justice-killers that in many cases are still out there.”


Yeah, Ontario is truly a creepy place, so is the north. This post is even more ironic in light of reading some comments online where a Canadian bashed Americans for their ‘serial killer filled nation’. Yes, there are all kinds of crazy in a nation of 300 million people … but Canada creeps me out infinitely more.


Post script

I finally got around to reading this book. Let me warn you, it is disturbing. And it comes with everything you’d expect from Canada: incompetence, bumbling; indifference that beggars belief.

Which includes: serious sexual offenders and killers sentenced to 5-10 years in prison; using techniques, technologies and systems 15+ years after they became available in the U.S.; even brushing off serial murder as an “American problem”, which apparently couldn’t exist in the magical land of Canada.

All this and more! Of the few cases which were solved, it was generally down to sheer luck or the help of witnesses. A couple more through DNA in recent years, after the offenders died. In addition to being disturbed, be prepared for healthy doses of outrage.

Highway of Tears

https://www.cbsnews.com/video/highway-of-tears-3/

This is a CBS piece on the missing women from the “Highway of Tears” (Highway 16) in British Columbia. In 40 years authorities have only solved a handful of murders. Although it’s tempting to picture a lone diabolical killer, in all practical reality there are multiple serial killers at work. The police list the number of official cases at just under 20 victims, but advocate groups say it’s double that number or more.

More fun in British Columbia. I’ve lived in northern B.C. and it’s a hell hole full of pedophiles, rapists, hillbillies and other general weirdoes, to put it generously. (Don’t forget the Mennonites.)

I’ve been on this highway plenty of times, and once got a ride with a trucker who I could’ve sworn was one of the killers (I say that based on his general demeanor and the way he talked about missing women). Nothing, and I mean nothing about the north or this shit hole country would surprise me any more.


For all the moaning and gasping about “dangerous America”, you’ll note that most crime, and violent crime at that – happens in Canada’s smallest cities and communities.

RCMP Overview: Missing & Murdered Aboriginal Women

I would like access to the full report (not just the overview) but this will have to do for now.

LINK / PDF  (Quotes below)

Summary:

“Police-recorded incidents of Aboriginal female homicides and unresolved missing Aboriginal females in this review total 1,181 – 164 missing and 1,017 homicide victims.

There are 225 unsolved cases of either missing or murdered Aboriginal females: 105 missing for more than 30 days as of November 4, 2013, whose cause of disappearance was categorized at the time as “unknown” or “foul play suspected” and 120 unsolved homicides between 1980 and 2012.

The total indicates that Aboriginal women are over-represented among Canada’s murdered and missing women.

There are similarities across all female homicides. Most homicides were committed by men and most of the perpetrators knew their victims — whether as an acquaintance or a spouse.

The majority of all female homicides are solved (close to 90%) and there is little difference in solve rates between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal victims.”

Information sourcing:

“What this project did differently was to supplement publicly available data with a comprehensive extract of information from law enforcement holdings from across all police jurisdictions in Canada. This fills a significant gap.”

“The RCMP has almost completed cross-referencing the data it collected from police records with NWAC and Dr. Pearce’s research. Reconciliation to date has been valuable in establishing these findings and improving police record data quality.”

“The total of missing Aboriginal females was based primarily on a report of all women listed as missing for more than 30 days across all police jurisdictions on the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) system as of November 4, 2013.”


Violence against Aboriginal women:

“They are at a higher risk of being victims of violence than non-Aboriginal females … 

The rate of victimization among Aboriginal females was close to three times higher than that of non-Aboriginal females.”

 “… there were 164 missing Aboriginal females as of November 4, 2013. They make up approximately 11.3% of the total number of missing females (1,455 total).”

[4.3% of female population = 11.3% of missing females]

Police estimates for the missing women:

Uknown = 61 / Foul Play = 44 / Accident = 45 / Lost or wandered off = 12 / Runaway = 2

Between 1980 – 2012:

“There were 1,017 Aboriginal female victims of homicide during this period, which represents roughly 16% of all female homicides — far greater than their representation in Canada’s female population as described above.”

Stats: 

“The number of Aboriginal female victims of homicide has remained relatively constant while the number of non-Aboriginal female victims has been declining.”

 “Aboriginal women accounted for 8% of female victims in 1984 as compared to 23% in 2012.” (They attribute this to the decrease of non-aboriginal female homicides)

“The Aboriginal female homicide rate per 100,000 population dropped from 7.60 to 4.45 between 1996 and 2011.”


Cause of Death:

Beating: Aboriginal women, approximately one-third 32% / Non-Aboriginal: 17%

Stabbing: Aboriginal 31%, / Non-Aboriginal: 27%

Shooting: Aboriginal 16% /Non-Aboriginal 26%

Strangled/Suffocated/Drowned: Aboriginal 13% / Non-Aboriginal: 22%

(They say further research needs to be done to understand differences.)

Location of killing is relatively the same except non-Aboriginal women are more likely to be killed at home, while Aboriginal women are twice as likely to be killed in an ‘open area’.


Related Criminality:

“Other assault” and “sexual assault” offences more likely to occur in Aboriginal murders.

Interestingly:

“It should be noted that only a small proportion of Aboriginal female homicides (approximately 2%) were described by investigators as linked to the drug trade or gang or organized crime activity.”

Offenders:

Relationship stats are generally the same, except non-Aboriginal women are more likely to be killed by a spouse, and Aboriginal women are more likely to be killed by an acquaintance. 

89% of the women’s killers (all groups) were male, no surprise there.

Offenders killing Aboriginal women more likely to have a criminal record, less likely to be employed and more likely to be on social assistance or disability. They were also more likely to have consumed some intoxicant substance.

They are less likely to have a mental disorder (10%) compared to NAF offenders (20%).

“The most frequent motive in Aboriginal female homicides was “argument or quarrel” representing 40% of all incidents (compared to 23% for non-Aboriginal females).”

“The data collected indicates that police solve almost 9 of every 10 female homicides, regardless of victim origin (88% for Aboriginal female homicides, 89% for non-Aboriginal female homicides). Other factors, such as victim involvement in certain occupations, may reduce the chance their murder will be solved.”


Risk Factors

Aboriginal women are less likely to be employed, more likely to be on a form of assistance, and more likely to support themselves through ‘illegal means’ (by 10%).

Aboriginal women are more likely to have consumed an intoxicating substance before death (63% to 20% for NAF).


Sex trade:

“Aboriginal female homicide victims involved was slightly higher than that of non-Aboriginal female homicide victims — 12% versus 5% respectively — which are both relatively small components of the available population.  

As a result, it would be inappropriate to suggest any significant difference in the prevalence of sex trade workers among Aboriginal female homicide victims as compared to non-Aboriginal female homicide victims.”

(How disappointing for all the rednecks who claimed the vast majority of these women were prostitutes and therefore ‘did it to themselves’!)

Aboriginal women being slightly double NAF in the sex trade is worth noting, but hardly significant in terms of overall missing and murdered indigenous women. (There’s also no indication of the general number of NAF in prostitution). Even if we account for offenders being Johns, what of the others?

Then we come to the RCMP “efforts” to be implemented, to summarize:

–  Partnering with local and municipal forces for unresolved cases
– “Prevention efforts” aka targeting high risk communities
– “Increasing public awareness”


Here’s my favorite bit for ‘Strengthening the Data’:

“To continue to ensure there is solid data available for operational decision-making and to ensure RCMP members record the most relevant information possible for Statistics Canada, the RCMP will roll out changes to how it collects data on homicides and missing persons. As a result of this project, the RCMP will ensure that Aboriginal origin is captured as part of Homicide Surveys.”

You mean it hasn’t been up to this time? 

Another gold bit:

“Second, the use of the term “Aboriginal” as a descriptor has different definitions in the different data sources that make up this research project. For example, CPIC captures Aboriginal as an “ethnicity” whereas Statistics Canada’s official position is that “Aboriginal” is not an ethnicity but rather an origin. Where possible, the above report attempts to use Statistics Canada compliant language.”


And that’s it. That is the end of the overview. Here is what I take away from this:

1) I basically learned nothing and the five minutes I spent reading a quick Statistics Canada page (for the last post on this topic) was just as enlightening in much less time.

2) We still don’t know why Aboriginal women are being killed at a higher rate, and there’s no real attempt to pinpoint a cause. With such a small percentage in the sex trade, what about the others?

3) I am left with the same conclusion as my last post: are the “acquaintances” Aboriginal or not? That will explain the discrepancy.

4) The only thing you can really gather from this overview is that a bunch of drunk, unemployed losers, on welfare and disability, are getting pissed off and into “arguments” with Aboriginal women and then beating them to death.

Really? That’s it? A bunch of pathetic slobs getting drunk and killing Native women?


Here is what cakers have said: it’s their own family members killing them (not true). That turned into: it’s their own boyfriends and husbands (turns out less than NAFs). Then: they were all prostitutes (again not true).

How can they be 4% of the female population yet over 10% of the missing women? How can they be 4% of the population, yet account for 10-16% of the murders (up to 23%)? Especially when they are less likely to be killed by a spouse or family member than NAF? Why are they most likely to be killed in Yukon or Saskatchewan (with a white majority population)?

Does it all boil down to some loser leeches who feel big by treading on their “inferiors”? Who are these fat grease-stained slobs anyway? Aboriginal? White? Other?

I really don’t feel that I’ve come away with any answers from this. I did get to read some stats and look at some fancy charts though.


Post Script:

Why won’t the RCMP answer The Toronto Star’s questions?

RCMP won’t comment on discrepancies in the Missing Database (Globe & Mail)