Contradictions in Canada: Blacks

Canada: land of cognitive dissonance.

Here is one example of Canadian contradiction:


Blacks


Black people have been in Canada since the early 1600’s and unknown to a large segment of Canadians, they were also slaves in early colonial Canada (black history in general is overlooked or completely ignored).

Few enough think about the experience of black Canadians: regular racism, discrimination, lack of empathy and dismissive attitudes about their hardships. Most Canadians flippantly tell them that racism against blacks is a problem in the USA, not here.

Most Canadians know about issues of racism against Aboriginals, but believe that racism against blacks is minimal in Canada. Canadians love to shake their finger at their American neighbors and self-righteously proclaim themselves so superior in issues of race – particularly regarding black people. But as is so often the case with cakers, their self-image and reality are at blunt odds…

The data shows that when it comes to hate crimes, black Canadians are the number one victim! They account for roughly half of all racial hate crimes, which is parallel with American stats.

The USA has 10x the population level of Canada: 35 million vs 318  million. Black Canadians make up 2.9% of Canada’s population while black Americans make up 13.3% of the population. Which begs the question: who has the bigger problem here?

It should be noted that the likely reason hate crimes against Aboriginals are so low is because half their population resides on remote reserves, and a large percentage of the rest live on reserves inside cities or on the outskirts.

What can we conclude from all this? Cakers are no better than their American neighbors, and in fact a whole lot worse in most ways! 

Canada has a problem with racism. In fact, Canada has many problems … all swept under the rug so as to look good in front of the world. 


Note: While re-posting this, I updated it with current stats. I knew they would be no different because Canada never changes. 

Update: since this post, Statistics Canada has stopped compiling hate crimes information on individual groups and has combined them together.


Stats Can: 

2017 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/181129/t001a-eng.htm

2015/16 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/85-002-x/2018001/article/54915-eng.htm

2014/15 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/85-002-x/2017001/article/14832-eng.htm

2013 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/85-002-x/2015001/article/14191-eng.htm#a11

2012 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/85-002-x/2014001/article/14028-eng.htm

2009/10 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/85-002-x/2012001/article/11635-eng.htm